Posted tagged ‘audiobook’

New commercial audiobook

October 6, 2015

As I mentioned earlier, I now have another audiobook available on Audible. This time it is a collection of gentle cat-related little stories called Herding Cats and written by a very nice chap called Christopher J. F. Gibson.

I’ve been a cat-lover since my early childhood, and when our last cat departed this life, we wondered if we would ever be able to bear having another – he and his adopted sister had both lived to eighteen and were such characters that they seemed irreplaceable. However, the cat-shaped hole in our lives was too big, and it was time for a visit to the cat rescue centre. My brief was not to look at any orange cats (too much like Oscar).

“Ah!” said the lovely lady, “so you’d like two cats? We have a four-month old brother and sister whose owner has been evicted. Follow me!” And a small ball of grey fluff immediately wound around my legs. “This is Winifred,” said my guide. “And her brother is rather shy.” I peeped over the partition. “DO NOT LOOK!” I said to my son. Of course he did. There was a tiny, terrified orange person huddled in the corner. Well… the rest, of course, is history.

It transpired, however, that the charming little female ball of fluff was, in fact, male. Winifred has become Fred and is now a fluffy-tailed feline dictator. The terrified small orange person is now an anarchist whose favourite pastime is leaping on to the top of doors.

So… these stories immediately struck a chord with me.

Herding Cats by Christopher J. F. Gibson
43 mins
Audible UK £3.09 Audible USA $3.95
(I don’t think much of that exchange rate.)

As usual I have some complimentary review copies to give away. Drop me a line if you would like one, and please specify whether US or UK.

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My Commercial Recordings

September 27, 2015

Some of you will know that I made some commercial recordings for a start-up called Iambik a few years ago. That hasn’t really come to anything (though they are still available on Audible), but in the last year I have also been commissioned to do some on Audible’s own platform, ACX.

It makes a pleasant change to record books which are more contemporary, though there are many books in the Public Domain which I still want to record for LibriVox and Legamus. Legamus recordings are only out of copyright in countries such as the UK and other European countries whose copyright laws depend on the death date of the author (i.e. 70+ years since their death), unlike my LibriVox recordings which are also out of copyright in the USA (whose copyright laws depend on date of publication).

My ACX recordings are now available on the Audible sites, Amazon and iTunes: details may be found on this page.

I do have some complimentary codes available, so please email me if you would like one. Please tell me whether you use the US or UK Audible site.

I have just completed a book of short stories which should be released in the next few days, and I am currently recording a very different kind of novel from my customary genres icon_wink. I’ll post details of both as they are released.

Thank you for your support. It’s good to know that there are people out there listening to my work icon_biggrin.

The World’s Lumber Room by Selina Gaye

October 2, 2012

As the author, Selina Gaye (1840 – 1914), writes in her preface: “The object of this volume is to give, in popular form, an account of some of the many ways in which refuse is made and disposed of, first and chiefly by Nature, and secondly by Man.” So, yes, it is nine hours of rubbish. 😉

This recording is a little out of the ordinary for me, but I found the book enthralling, and having recorded it, I do indeed look at dust and rubbish with new eyes, though it doesn’t in truth make housework any more pleasurable.

In the midst of this recording, I wasn’t very well for some time and couldn’t do much, so I spent many hours in front of the television. I discovered many interesting programmes that dealt with the natural world, in particular geologist Prof. Iain Stewart’s excellent documentaries Earth: The Power of the Planet and How Earth Made Us.

To my surprise, there seems to be little in Selina Gaye’s book that has actually been disproved more than a century later. She admits herself that the science of the day did not yet provide the answers to some questions (the cause of earthquakes, for instance), but this is unsurprising as plate tectonics had not even been thought of when the book was written in 1885.

Miss Gaye clearly consulted many scientific authorities of the day, using as her sources works such as Elements of Chemical and Physical Geology by Gustav Bischof, Darwin’s Journal of Researches, Coral Reefs and Vegetable Mould and Earthworms, Dana’s Coral Reefs and Islands, Maury’s The Physical Geography of the Sea, and the Earl of Dunraven’s The Great Divide among many other books and scientific journals.

I really enjoyed recording this. I learned a lot, and it made me much more curious about the natural world than I had ever been before. I do hope you find the same.

Here it is: http://librivox.org/the-worlds-lumber-room-by-selina-gaye/

LibriVox recording: The Speaking Voice

February 16, 2012

Well, this was a challenge: take a book by an extremely successful dramatic reader in the early 1900s, and follow her training programme on the speaking voice and the vocal interpretation of various literary genres.

This is not a book designed for the professional reader’s training. It is meant for anyone who wants to get the best out of their voice in ordinary life. Watch out, though – if you are in the habit of wearing tight corsets, she has some severe words for you! 😆

The first two parts of the book deal with vocal production and techniques such as change of pitch, inflection and tone colour, then the eight chapters of the third part offer studies on various genres such as the essay, the short story, several types of poetry, ending with dramatic monologues and plays.

Actually, by the time I reached the last few chapters, she had more or less given up trying to teach me anything, because she said I was supposed to know it all by then, so those chapters comprise mostly complete poems for one’s own personal study.

I did find it interesting. I think I found it useful. I hope that others may also find it so. Never having been a devotee of the great English poets Shelley, Wordsworth, Coleridge and Tennyson – indeed, to be honest, never having been a great devotee of any poetry at all – I was surprised, and really rather pleased to be forced to study some of their poems. And even more pleased to find that I could appreciate them.

Here it is:
http://librivox.org/the-speaking-voice-by-katherine-jewell-everts/

Section 11 includes a detailed study of Shelley’s Ode to a Skylark and, in the order they appear, the complete poems:
The Lesser Children, or A Threnody at the Hunting Season by Ridgley Torrence
Hunting Song by Sir Walter Scott
It was a Lover and his Lass by William Shakespeare
Pack, Clouds, Away and Welcome Day by Thomas Heywood
Memory and Enamoured Architect of Airy Rhyme by Thomas Bailey Aldrich
Love in the Winds by Richard Hovey
Candlemas by Alice Brown
She Was a Phantom of Delight by William Wordsworth
Nonsense Lyrics Topsy-turvy World and I Saw a New World by William Brighty Rands
Hymn Before Sunrise, in the Vale of Chamouni by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Juan’s Song from The Spanish Gypsy by George Eliot
Pablo’s Song from The Spanish Gypsy by George Eliot
My Star by Robert Browning
Cavalier Tunes Marching Along by Robert Browning
Garden Fancies The Flower’s Name by Robert Browning.

Section 12 has a study of part of Rabbi Ben Ezra by Robert Browning, and the complete poems:
Each and All by Ralph Waldo Emerson
Forbearance by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Section 13 comprises mostly just the complete short story The Revolt of ‘Mother’ by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman.

Section 14 has a study of a cutting of Gareth and Lynette from Tennyson’s Idylls of the King.

Section 15 has the complete poems:

A Tale (epilogue to Two Poets of Croisic) by Robert Browning
Incident of the French Camp
My Last Duchess


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